Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if my animal needs physiotherapy?


If your animal has suffered an injury, recently undergone surgical treatment or has a chronic musculoskeletal or neuromuscular condition, physiotherapy will help to reduce pain, optimise tissue healing and restore musculoskeltal or neuromuscular function. A horse suffering pain will often show a behavioural issue such as bucking, rearing, bolting, refusal to jump, kicking and biting. A decrease in athletic performance, poor transitions, disunited canter and difficulty working in an outline are also often a result of pain. Signs that a dog is suffering pain include difficulty when getting up, difficulty climbing stairs, reluctance to play or go for a walk, poor appetite, licking, biting, aggression, looking sad and increased sleeping. Veterinary physiotherapy may also be used to enhance and develop athletic performance, reduce risk of injury and improve recovery post-competition.




How many physiotherapy treatment sessions will my animal need?


The number of physiotherapy treatment sessions required to resolve pain and restore optimum musculoskeletal and neuromuscular function will depend on the type and severity of injury or musculoskeletal or neurological condition. A follow up treatment or several treatment sessions may be necessary to resolve the primary issue. Follow up treatments are important to assess the animals response to physiotherapy treatment, check on progress and to adjust the remedial exercises, stretches and electrotherapy use and settings that may have been left for the owner to perform.Thereafter, maintainence treatments are recommended to maintain optimum musculoskeletal and neuromusclar function. Quarterly check up treatments (sometimes more frequently) are recommended as the detection and treatment of a musculoskeletal or neuromuscular weakness or potential issue before it worsens or results in the development of secondary compensatory issues will ensure that the animal is not suffering pain and is performing to their full athletic potential. In the case that the animal is considered to require veterinary attention , the case will be immediately reffered to the animals vet.




Why do I need to get veterinary consent prior to physiotherapy treatment?


Sections 19 and 20 of the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966 state that a veterinary physiotherapist can only treat animals under veterinary referral or consent.




Will I need to book a treatment session in advance?


Yes you will need to book a treatment session in advance. Please contact Laura to discuss physiotherapy for your animal and to book a treatment session. Phone: 07592 142 515 Email: lauraburnhamvetphysio@gmail.com




Will my insurance company pay for physiotherapy treatment?


NAVP members are recognised by veterinary insurance companies when submitting a claim to reimburse veterinary physiotherapy treatment costs. Most insurance companies will pay for physiotherapy treatment if the animal has suffered an injury, recently undergone surgery or has been diagnosed with a chronic musculoskeletal or neurological condition. However, it is advisory that you check this with your insurance provider.




I have booked some events; will my horse be able to be ridden after physiotherapy treatment?


Two days off ridden exercise is usually required following physiotherapy treatment. This is because the tissues response to physiotherapy occurs up to 24 to 48 hours post treatment. Physiotherapy treatment may initially result in increased muscle soreness and stiffness caused by the release of chemical substances from the tissue as a result of massage and electrotherapy. This is normal and is not of concern.




Will my dog need to rest after physiotherapy?


When appropriate, Laura will prescribe a bespoke remedial exercise plan to meet the individuals requirements that is safe, effecftive and progressive. Therefore the remedial exercise prescribed will depend on the individual as some patients may require a reduction in exercise, whereas others may require an increase in exercise along with introduction to different exericse types. Athletic and working dogs are usually required to have two days off from their usual training following physiotherapy treatment. This is because the tissues response to physiotherapy occurs up to 24 to 48 hours post treatment. Physiotherapy treatment may initially result in increased muscle soreness and stiffness before the animal improves. This is normal and is not of concern.




How should I prepare my horse or dog for assessment and physiotherapy?


Your horse or dog needs to be presented clean from mud and sweat and be dry for assessment and treatment. A quiet and calm environment for assessment and treatment is preferred. Your horse may be more relaxed if there is a companion present.





Please do contact us if you would like to discuss veterinary physiotherapy for your animal or have any enquiries. We look forward to hearing from you.

Laura Burnham Veterinary Physiotherapy     T: 07592 142515     E: info@lauraburnhamvetphysio.co.uk

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